Facebook Apologized to Eric Meyer: What the Pubic Has to Say [WATCH VIDEO]

By Ambika Thakur | 2 years ago
Facebook Apologized to Eric Meyer:  What the Pubic Has to Say [WATCH VIDEO]

On Friday, Facebook issued an apology to a designer, author, and Event Apart expo contributor Eric Meyer over how its auto-generated "Year in Review" posting feature could light up the most awful parts of a very bad year. The Hollywood Reporter has shared the story on Facebook. Many users commented on the post. The public has different reactions to this apology. Read on for furtehr details.

“You didn't have to do it, the post was optional. Didn't like your year? Don't review it,” wrote username Erica Starr Goings.


“Good grief. People will complain about anything lol,” penned username Rafael Jordan.

“It is a choice to use it or not. They reveal a preview of what it will look like, and if it is not to your liking, you don't have to post it. It is not some big surprise,” wrote username Polly Morton Fiske.

 Or people can just stop living on Facebook. Perhaps that's too logical for some people,” wrote username Adam Carrillo.

 “What is wrong with people? I saw my 'year in review' post pop up, didn't care about it and immediately deleted it. I didn't have a bad year or anything, but I didn't give it two seconds of thought. Why are we inventing things to get angry about? Delete your facebook account if something this frivolous gets you enraged, you are clearly in too deep,” expressed username Gabriel Sabloff.

 “Then don't SHARE your end review! Its Private until you make public. I take it the folks Whining didn't look through their review and delete or added items before sharing,” wrote username Lorri D Mason.

Eric Meyer took to his personal blog on Christmas Eve to examine how Facebook's autopost feature went so erroneous. The app was designed to digitally scrapbook liked and photo-loaded content in order to review the year in a nutshell of all Facebook users in 2014.

But for Meyer, the feature put a obtrusive limelight on his own past year: his 2014 was "celebrated" in the image, which used a photo of his recently departed daughter and circled it with joyful iconography. His daughter died of brain cancer at the tender age of six. “To show me Rebecca’s face and say 'Here’s what your year looked like!' is jarring.  It feels wrong, and coming from an actual person, it would be wrong.  Coming from code, it’s just unfortunate.  These are hard, hard problems.  It isn’t easy to programmatically figure out if a picture has a ton of Likes because it’s hilarious, astounding, or heartbreaking,” wrote Meyer.

He pleaded to make opting out of such content easier or at least for Facebook to skip displaying autogenerated images at users by default. On Friday, The Washington Post published an apology from Facebook product manager Jonathan Gheller. Meyer confirmed that he received a personal apology directly from Facebook, and he updated his personal blog to shed light on his purpose of highlighting the story.

"Taking worst-case scenarios into account is something that Web design does poorly and usually not at all. I was using Facebook’s Year in Review as one example, a timely and relevant foundation to talk about a much wider issue," Meyer wrote.


Meyer went so far as to apologize to the Facebook team responsible for "dropping the Internet on [their] head for Christmas," adding that he believed conventional outlets reported the story "without the context I assumed the audience would have."

That’s it for the scoop on Facebook’s new automated year-end feature, "Year in Review."   For more entertainment dates, stay tuned here on Movie News Guide (MNG).

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Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons/ Soerfm