The Purge: Anarchy Movie Review [WATCH VIDEO]

By Rochelle Paula Carino | 2 years ago
The Purge: Anarchy Movie Review [WATCH VIDEO]

The movie that gave way to justify all acts of violence comes back to the big screen with triple carnage. “The Purge: Anarchy”  is the definite suspense thriller sequel that will bring its viewers on supreme edge. It features the acting of Frank Grillo, Carmen Ejogo, Zach Gilford, Kiele Sanchez, Zoë Soul and Justina Machado. It’s written and directed by James DeMonaco. Read on to know more about “The Purge: Anarchy.”

“The Purge: Anarchy” Synopsis:


The film begins with young waitress, Eva Sanchez (Carmen Ejogo), and her daughter, Cali (Zoë Soul), who finds themselves pushed in the open when The Purge began. The Purge is an annual event restituted by the American government which legalizes all kinds of crimes within 12 hours. The mother -daughter then gets victimized by a sex offender and misguided soldiers. They were then rescued by an armed stranger named Sergeant (Frank Grillo), who also had his own criminal pursuit. However, he just couldn’t bear the thought of leaving two innocent lives getting thrashed by unlawful bastards. He knew that these were typical criminals that did not see the reasoning behind such legislation, which then caused him to save and take them under his protective wing.  Later on, the trio was joined by young married couple, Shane (Zach Gilford) and Liz (Kiele Sanchez). They were going through the final stages of their divorce when their car broke down in the middle of the road, just in time when everything started. Once they all exchanged pleasantries and obliged to watch over each other’s backs, they now move forward towards the day that bears the promise of intense violence. All throughout their journey for survival, Sergeant’s criminal pursuit was then revealed as he’s out in search of blood for the man who took away his son’s life. From here, the story turns into a fast-paced sequence of action, thriller and ultimate survival.

“The Purge: Anarchy” Review:

The film is obviously based on the original movie “The Purge” which was released in 2013. See, the thing about sequels is that they can either outshine the original or stay behind its shadows. For this movie’s case, it was able to successfully retain the annual government sanctioned mayhem, but it has failed to maintain the furtive elements that made the first film stand out.

According to The Beacon News, the first film depicted a wickedly satirical sense of humor with its overall impact. These are the elements that basically made “The Purge” a movie worth watching. But now that these two things are no longer found, it categorizes the sequel as one that should be left in the shadows.

In the first film, majority of the critics pin pointed its lack of expansion with the way it focused within just one household. It seems the producers took their criticisms to heart that they created a somewhat dystopian urban area as the main stage in the second film forgoing the houses and elaborating the streets. The film offers the simple yet blatant expressions of grimness and brutality on the streets, and that’s all there is to it — simplicity served in a platter of mediocrity.

In a critique by Forbes, the whole film is all about evading danger, and it offers genuine scenes depicting the crucial moments of life documented in several points of view.

Despite the film turning out to be an immediate bust compared to the first movie, “The Purge: Anarchy” can still be appreciated in a way that it presents the value of life with intense depiction under the influence of violence and crime. The film’s plot holds great promise, and it certainly brings forth a different facet into horror flicks.

Based on Variety, the scarcity and uniqueness of the storyline makes it incomparable to the plots of other horror films, making it an immediate success in the movie industry.

That’s a wrap for “The Purge: Anarchy.” Stay attuned to Movie News Guide (MNG) for more updates in the entertainment scene.

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Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons/ Gage Skidmore