Wes Craven: Veteran Horror Director Succcumbs To Cancer, ‘Freddy Krueger’ Will Have A Timely Reboot With ‘Orphan’ Writer

By Lex Lopez | 1 year ago
Wes Craven: Veteran Horror Director Succcumbs To Cancer, ‘Freddy Krueger’ Will Have A Timely Reboot With ‘Orphan’ Writer

Wes Craven the veteran Hollywood director, who seared into the memory of the big screen the dreadful Freddy Krueger died of brain cancer. Read on for more details.

In a report from The Hollywood Reporter, the 76-year-old director succumbed last Sunday in his family home in Los Angeles. The maestro of the “slasher genre” is survived by his wife and producer Iya Labunka.


Craven stamped his name behind the camera of the horror genre with “A Nightmare on Elm Street.” The titular antagonist of the movie, the aforementioned defaced entity Krueger vengefully haunts the dreams of teenagers as he wields a bladed glove on his right hand. The said movie was also renowned as it introduced moviegoers to a young Johnny Depp. The said movie had a modest budget of $1.8 million was able to carved an over-all net $25 million.

The narrative of being appallingly killed in one’s dreams and perishing in the real world successfully launched eight more films depicting the Krueger character. Craven went back in directing his morbid project once more in 1994 with “Wes Craven’s New Nightmare.”

Aside from famously crafting the franchise for “A Nightmare on Elm Street,” Craven directed the “Scream” horror franchise which began stabbing its way in the silver screen in 1996. The franchise starred Neve Campbell, Courteney Cox, and David Arquette. Like most of his other movies, Craven made cameo appearances in four of the installments of the movie: as a janitor, a doctor, a tourist and as a coroner.

Wesley Earl Craven was born in a buttoned-down Baptist home in Cleveland on Aug. 2, 1939. He  secured a master’s in philosophy and writing in Johns Hopkins University.

Craven started his cinematic calling in the pornographic film industry. In 1972, the director released “The Last House on the Left” his first film feature, It illustrated a ragtag bunch of misfits abducting two girls for their own carnal pleasure. The flick was greatly suppressed in most countries due to its narrative of machismo, cruelty, rape and murder of the girls and their psychotic killers.

Other game-changing works from the director that etched firmly in the horror genre are “The Hills Have Eyes” (1977), “The Serpent” and the “Rainbow” (1988), “Shocker” (1989) and “Red Eye” (2005).

In related news, “Nightmare on Elm Street” will have another rendition after it broke out a bloody homecoming in 2010 with the Samuel Bayer remake. The said reboot according to The Wrap, will have a screenplay by “Orphan” alumnus David Leslie Johnson.

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Photo Source: Wikimedia/Bob Bekian