Stories We Tell Have a Universal Appeal

By admin | 5 years ago

Stories We TellActress Sarah Polley takes a look into her own family for her latest documentary Stories We Tell. The movie is a mystery tale, wrapped in a love story. She manages to make it engrossing as she explores the life of her late mother Diane, who died when she was only 11 years of age.

Diane is a minor Canadian actress who turned into a casting agent. She has two children from a previous marriage that ended in 1967. She made the headlines because her case was the first time a mother gave custody of her kids to her husband. She then married Polley’s father, Michael, and he recalls his time with Diane.

Polley probes into the other kids’ family joke that Sarah might have a different biological father. She finds out that her mother was in Montreal for a play before she was born and met a producer named Harry. The movie transitions to Super-8 videos showing Diane dancing in the 1970s and 80s.

Polley says that the truth is subjective. She has a small amount of footage of her mother and the rest of the time, an actress plays Diane in recreations of home movies. An actor also plays the part of the young Harry. Stories We Tell includes behind the scenes video showing Polley with the actress playing her mother.

Some people might say that this is a break in documentary rules regarding trust, veracity and manipulation. But filmmaker Polley notes that individual points of view color our memories. Alter on she says that stories about ourselves and our families are what Stories We Tell are about. It is a way Polley’s distinctive family experience deals with shared past and gives the story a universal appeal. She masterfully underscores the point. It might be about her family history but there are elements in it that everyone can connect with.
Actress and director Sarah Polley takes a look into her own family for her latest documentary Stories We Tell. The movie is a mystery tale, wrapped in a love story. She manages to make it engrossing as she explores the life of her late mother Diane, who died when she was only 11 years of age.

Diane is a minor Canadian actress who turned into a casting agent. She has two children from a previous marriage that ended in 1967. She made the headlines because her case was the first time a mother gave custody of her kids to her husband. She then married Polley’s father, Michael, and he recalls his time with Diane.

Polley probes into the other kids’ family joke that Sarah might have a different biological father. She finds out that her mother was in Montreal for a play before she was born and met a producer named Harry. The movie transitions to Super-8 videos showing Diane dancing in the 1970s and 80s.

Polley says that the truth is subjective. She has a small amount of footage of her mother and the rest of the time, an actress plays Diane in recreations of home movies. An actor also plays the part of the young Harry. Stories We Tell includes behind the scenes video showing Polley with the actress playing her mother.

Some people might say that this is a break in documentary rules regarding trust, veracity and manipulation. But filmmaker Polley notes that individual points of view color our memories. Alter on she says that stories about ourselves and our families are what Stories We Tell are about. It is a way Polley’s distinctive family experience deals with shared past and gives the story a universal appeal. She masterfully underscores the point. It might be about her family history but there are elements in it that everyone can connect with.

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